Undergraduate Research Opportunities

Department of Psychological Sciences

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Undergraduate Research Opportunities

PSY 39000 (Research Experience in Psychology)

PSY 39000 is a course that allows you to work as a research assistant on projects managed by a faculty member or graduate student in the Department of Psychological Sciences. Through this course, you’ll gain hands-on experience in data collection and learn skills such as data analysis, data interpretation and writing. The course will also allow you to develop contacts for job references and letters of recommendation as well as enhance the competitiveness of your application for graduate school, professional school or a variety of careers.

Faculty Accepting Undergraduate Students — Summer 2024

Faculty member and other supervisors

Teri Kirby, PhD, Assistant Professor – Social Psychology
Austin Zeng, Lab Coordinator
Junming Zhang, Graduate Researcher

Description of research area

Research in Dr. Kirby’s lab explores a range of topics related to diversity, inclusion, identity, prejudice, and discrimination. We most often focus on racial/ethnic, gender/sex, and LGBTQ+ diversity.

Recent topics of investigation include:

  • Diversity ideologies: ideas about how to accommodate differences across ethnic, gender, and sexual orientation categories (e.g., multicultural and colorblind approaches to diversity)
  • Diversity initiatives: intersectional approaches to diversity initiatives, how diversity initiatives shape sensitivity to discrimination, self-concept, stereotyping, and academic/workplace outcomes
  • The co-opting of diversity by majority/privileged groups
  • Cultural appropriation
  • Intersectionality and feminism
Description of undergraduate participation

Research assistants typically gain experience running participants in experimental lab studies, recruiting research participants, programming surveys, collecting survey data, entering or analyzing data, reviewing relevant psychological literature, and helping to design studies. They also gain experience with software that can be useful for graduate school (e.g., Qualtrics, Zotero, SPSS, R and RStudio).

Research assistants attend research group meetings to discuss projects in the lab and learn more about the research process. Finally, more senior research assistants may have the opportunity to conduct independent research projects and mentor/train more junior assistants.

Research setting

Labs in Psychology Building

Number of assistants needed

1-4

Contact information

Please submit your application at:
https://purdue.ca1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_9tzVkWICaZbikMC

For questions, please contact Austin Zeng: zeng297@purdue.edu

Faculty member

Hongmi Lee (she/her), Assistant Professor, Cognitive Psychology

Description of Research Area 

In the Lee Memory and Cognition Lab, we investigate how the human brain remembers complex real-world events. Our research is focused on understanding the characteristics of narrated memory recall for experiences resembling real-life situations (e.g., free web browsing) and the brain mechanisms that support the storage and recall of those experiences. We utilize a combination of behavioral experiments and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).

Description of Undergraduate Participation

As undergraduate research assistants, you will work closely with other lab members, contributing to a range of tasks essential for our fMRI and behavioral experiments. These tasks primarily include participant recruitment, preparation, and testing, as well as data coding, organization, and basic analysis. Additionally, you will have the opportunity to attend lab meetings and other lab-related events. If you express interest and demonstrate the required skills, you may also have the chance to develop your independent research project.

Research Setting

Most of the research activity will take place in our lab space and testing rooms on the 2nd floor of Peirce Hall. fMRI experiments will be conducted at the Purdue Life Science MRI Facility on campus.

Number of Assistants Needed:

1 – 3 students

Contact Information

Hongmi Lee / Lee Memory and Cognition Lab

E-mail: LeeMemoryAndCognitionLab@gmail.com

Phone: N/A Office: 3160 PSYC

Additional Comments

To apply, please send an email to LeeMemoryAndCognitionLab@gmail.com with the following materials:

  • A very brief statement (no longer than one page) describing 1) who you are, 2) why you are interested in joining our lab, 3) your prior research experience and technical skills (e.g., computer programming), and 4) your weekly availability
  • A CV or resume, if available
  • An unofficial transcript

Although we prefer students with relevant skills and/or who intend to be involved over a longer period, all interested students are encouraged to apply. Students from underrepresented or marginalized groups are particularly encouraged to apply.

Faculty member or graduate student

Dr. Thekla Morgenroth (they/them/their), Assistant Professor—Social Psychology

Kira Means (she/her), graduate student – Social Psychology

Heejoo Chung (she/her), graduate student – Social Psychology

Yanzhe (Austin) Zeng (he/him), lab manager – Social Psychology

Description of research area 

Research in the UNICORN (UNderstanding Identity and the COntinuance of Roles and Norms) lab examines how and why people defend and maintain social categories and hierarchies.

Topics of investigation include:

  • LGBTQ+ issues
  • Gender and the gender binary
  • The psychology of different feminist ideologies
  • Opposition to trans-inclusive policies
  • Stereotypes and prejudice
Description of undergraduate participation

The lab experience is designed to provide students with hands-on experience with the research process.

Research assistants have the opportunity to:

  • Conduct research using a variety of research designs and methods
  • Gain experience in software used for research (e.g., Qualtrics, SPSS)
  • Engage with and code open-response data
  • Read and analyze published academic articles
  • Be active participants in weekly lab meetings and discussions about research

More experienced research assistants also have opportunities to:

  • Engage in independent research projects, mentored by Dr. Morgenroth
  • Present their results to the lab
  • Train and mentor incoming undergraduate research assistants
Research setting

Work will be carried out in a joint lab space in person at specific times (depending on your schedule).

Number of assistants needed

2-5

To apply

Please fill out the following survey by March 22nd. You will hear back within 1-2 weeks of this deadline.

https://purdue.ca1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_a8CUIaw5Qvcm7lQ

Additional comments

Members of underrepresented or marginalized groups are particularly encouraged to apply. In addition, individuals interested in pursuing careers in academic research and/or who may be interested in working in the lab for more than one semester are particularly encouraged to apply. Students should be able to commit at least 6 hours/week (2 credits).

Faculty Accepting Undergraduate Students — Fall 2024

Faculty member

Chris Agnew, PhD, Professor, Social Psychology, RSVP Lab Director

Description of Research 

We conduct research on interpersonal relationships and are particularly focusing on relationship processes that take place in virtual reality (VR).

Description of Undergraduate Participation

Research assistants perform a variety of tasks, including collecting data in our VR lab. You will be trained on how to conduct research involving participants who interact within VR. We also often design new VR studies together as a lab team. Lab team meetings take place weekly, either in person or via Horizon Workrooms in VR, with lab team members using lab-supplied Meta Quest headsets to attend. Team members also assist with relationship experiments and surveys not focused on VR.

Research Setting

All work is completed in the Psychological Sciences building or in virtual space. Research assistants spend most of their hours working in the lab.

Number of Assistants Needed:

We are recruiting up to 4 new undergraduate students to join the RSVP Lab in Fall 2025 to work alongside returning undergraduate research assistants. Research assistants are expected to work an average of 9 hours per week during the semester and receive 3 credits for PSY 39000.

How to Apply

Send (1) your CV, (2) unofficial Purdue transcript, (3) statement of research interests, and (4) reasons for applying, as one PDF file via email attachment to Dr. Agnew at agnew@purdue.edu. Minimum 3.3 overall GPA required. Interviews for the most promising applicants will take place via Zoom in April and May 2024 until positions are filled. Thx for your interest!

Faculty member or graduate student

Dr. Stephen B. Broomell Global Risk and Individual Decisions (GRID) Lab

Description of research area

Our lab is focused on understanding how individuals form judgments and make decisions in the face of risk and uncertainty. We leverage real world risks such as climate change, weather hazards, medical, or cyber risks and design experiments to investigate what features of the problem domain facilitate or hinder accurate judgment and effective decision-making regarding the risk.

Below are a few current research topics:

  • Communication of uncertain climate projections.
  • Developing and testing theories for how the form and presentation of information affects judgment.

More information can be found at: https://hhs.purdue.edu/grid-lab/

Description of undergraduate participation

Students can be involved in all phases of research, including designing experiments, testing participants, analyzing data, and presentations of study results. Students will also participate in regularly scheduled lab meetings and discussions of readings on relevant topics.

Research setting

The lab is located on the third floor in the Psychology Building.

Number of assistants needed

2-4 students. If you are interested in joining our laboratory, please fill out this survey.

If you have further questions, please contact Dr. Broomell using the email below.

Contact information

Email: broomell@purdue.edu

Faculty member

Dr. Jeffrey D. Karpicke
Cognition and Learning Lab

Description of Research Area 

The Cognition and Learning Lab conducts basic and applied research on how people learn. Specific areas of interest are as follows:

  • Identifying effective learning strategies
  • Metacognition and self-regulated learning
  • Developing computer-based learning tools
  • Memory retrieval processes and retrieval-based learning
Description of Undergraduate Participation

Students in the Cognition and Learning Lab have the opportunity to get involved in all phases of the research process. Most frequently this consists of running experimental sessions, helping to score and analyze data, and attending bi-weekly lab meetings. Additionally, students have the opportunity (although this is not required) to conduct independent research and learn more about experimental design/computer programming.

Research Setting

The Cognition and Learning Lab is located on the 1st floor of Peirce Hall.

Number of Assistants Needed:

2-4 research assistants are needed.

Contact Information

Students interested in doing PSY 390/391/498 in the Cognition and Learning Lab should complete an application by April 12th. We will follow up with you within two weeks of that deadline. If you have any questions, please direct them to Michelle Coverdale: mcoverda@purdue.edu

Additional Comments

For more information see our lab website. Students with GPAs of 3.4 and higher are particularly encouraged to apply.

Faculty member and other supervisors

Teri Kirby, PhD, Assistant Professor – Social Psychology
Austin Zeng, Lab Coordinator
Junming Zhang, Graduate Researcher

Description of research area

Research in Dr. Kirby’s lab explores a range of topics related to diversity, inclusion, identity, prejudice, and discrimination. We most often focus on racial/ethnic, gender/sex, and LGBTQ+ diversity.

Recent topics of investigation include:

  • Diversity ideologies: ideas about how to accommodate differences across ethnic, gender, and sexual orientation categories (e.g., multicultural and colorblind approaches to diversity)
  • Diversity initiatives: intersectional approaches to diversity initiatives, how diversity initiatives shape sensitivity to discrimination, self-concept, stereotyping, and academic/workplace outcomes
  • The co-opting of diversity by majority/privileged groups
  • Cultural appropriation
  • Intersectionality and feminism
Description of undergraduate participation

Research assistants typically gain experience running participants in experimental lab studies, recruiting research participants, programming surveys, collecting survey data, entering or analyzing data, reviewing relevant psychological literature, and helping to design studies. They also gain experience with software that can be useful for graduate school (e.g., Qualtrics, Zotero, SPSS, R and RStudio).

Research assistants attend research group meetings to discuss projects in the lab and learn more about the research process. Finally, more senior research assistants may have the opportunity to conduct independent research projects and mentor/train more junior assistants.

Research setting

Labs in Psychology Building

Number of assistants needed

1-4

Contact information

Please submit your application at:
https://purdue.ca1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_9tzVkWICaZbikMC

For questions, please contact Austin Zeng: zeng297@purdue.edu

Research Team

Principal Investigator: Franki Kung, Assistant Professor, I-O Psychology
Graduate Investigators: Rick Yang, and Dante Bruno

Description of Research Area 

At the Conflict and Mindset Collaboratory, we conduct research to help people and organizations effectively manage:

  • Culture and Diversity (e.g., diversity policies, cultural mindset, immigrants)
  • Conflict Resolution (e.g., negotiation, feedback effectiveness)
  • Multiple Goals (e.g., self-regulation, goal conflicts)
Description of Undergraduate Participation

We design the lab experience to prepare our undergraduate research assistants for graduate school and jobs in the fields of I-O and social psychology, management, human resource, and organizational behavior. Students will join a community of peers, researchers, and mentors passionate about the studies of diversity, conflict, and goals. Besides individual project team meetings and tasks, students attend lab meeting weekly to learn and discuss related issues and enjoy other social events throughout the semester (e.g., lunch, escape room, mini golf).

Junior research assistants will have the opportunities to

  • learn how to conduct online surveys, literature reviews, behavioral experiments, and qualitative analysis (e.g., picture coding, focus group analysis)
  • develop scientific thinking and presentation skills in weekly lab meetings
  • attend research and professional development workshops (e.g., literature review, survey design, data analysis)
  • honors contract or scholarly project

Senior research assistants (typically 1+ year experience) will have the opportunities to

  • manage participant recruitment and lab schedule
  • conduct training sessions
  • develop their own research ideas and design studies
  • present findings in academic conferences

We support and encourage student involvement in our lab through scholarship programs such as Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation, OUR Scholars, and Summer Stay Scholars.

Research Setting

Our research takes part mostly in our lab space (in the Psychological Sciences building) and some part of the work can be carried out remotely (e.g., from home).

Number of Assistants Needed:

5+

Contact Information

To Apply, please fill out this form and supply related documents.

Contact Dr. Kung at frankikung@purdue.edu if you have questions. Twitter: @ConflictMindset

Additional Comments

Preference is given to students who major or are interested in Psychology, Business, or related fields. Application is reviewed on a rolling basis throughout the semester – if you are interested, apply now!

Research Team

Dan Foti, PhD – Professor of Clinical Psychology Roslyn Harold, MS – Graduate Researcher

Description of Research Area 

Research in the PACER lab seeks to refine the phenotypic definitions of psychopathology by applying findings from basic neuroscience, with a particular emphasis on mood disorders and psychotic disorders. In our basic research, we examine the psychological and behavioral processes reflected by patterns of brain activity that can be measured in the laboratory using neuroimaging techniques (event-related potentials, or ERPs; functional magnetic resonance imaging, or fMRI). Much of this research focuses on how motivationally salient stimuli, such as monetary rewards and emotional images, are processed in the brain in healthy populations, as well as examining the relevant environmental contexts which shape this processing.

Currently, the lab is funded for a project examining why women who carry the Fragile X premutation are at drastically increased risk for developing depression as adults. This study is recruiting women from across the midwest to come to our lab and complete an EEG, MRI, blood draw, cognitive and neuropsychological tests, and a clinical interview. We hope this this study will help us understand what physiological processes are impacted by having this genetic premutation and how those processes might especially increase risk for depression in this group.

Description of Undergraduate Participation

Research assistants will help facilitate data collection by assisting with recruitment and screening efforts; accompanying participants between different research-related activities; preparing participants for and collecting EEG data; storage, preprocessing, and shipping of biological samples (blood); and entering or analyzing data. Research assistants are also welcome to attend lab meetings and will have opportunities to conduct their own independent research project.

Research Setting

Most of our research will take place in our lab space in the Psychological Sciences building and at the Life Science MRI facility. Some (but not all) work may be completed remotely.

Number of Assistants Needed:

1-2

Contact Information

For questions, please contact Roslyn Harold at rharold@purdue.edu

To apply, please fill out this form.

Additional Comments

Students who are successful in this application will have strong organizational skills and be able to interact with participants in a professional, easy manner. Those who are able to commit to working 6-9 hours per week (i.e. register for 2-3 PSY390 credits) and who have somewhat flexible weekday (Mon-Thurs) schedules during the morning and afternoon are strongly preferred.

Faculty member

Hongmi Lee (she/her), Assistant Professor, Cognitive Psychology

Description of Research Area 

In the Lee Memory and Cognition Lab, we investigate how the human brain remembers complex real-world events. Our research is focused on understanding the characteristics of narrated memory recall for experiences resembling real-life situations (e.g., free web browsing) and the brain mechanisms that support the storage and recall of those experiences. We utilize a combination of behavioral experiments and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).

Description of Undergraduate Participation

As undergraduate research assistants, you will work closely with other lab members, contributing to a range of tasks essential for our fMRI and behavioral experiments. These tasks primarily include participant recruitment, preparation, and testing, as well as data coding, organization, and basic analysis. Additionally, you will have the opportunity to attend lab meetings and other lab-related events. If you express interest and demonstrate the required skills, you may also have the chance to develop your independent research project.

Research Setting

Most of the research activity will take place in our lab space and testing rooms on the 2nd floor of Peirce Hall. fMRI experiments will be conducted at the Purdue Life Science MRI Facility on campus.

Number of Assistants Needed:

1 – 3 students

Contact Information

Hongmi Lee / Lee Memory and Cognition Lab

E-mail: LeeMemoryAndCognitionLab@gmail.com

Phone: N/A Office: 3160 PSYC

Additional Comments

To apply, please send an email to LeeMemoryAndCognitionLab@gmail.com with the following materials:

  • A very brief statement (no longer than one page) describing 1) who you are, 2) why you are interested in joining our lab, 3) your prior research experience and technical skills (e.g., computer programming), and 4) your weekly availability
  • A CV or resume, if available
  • An unofficial transcript

Although we prefer students with relevant skills and/or who intend to be involved over a longer period, all interested students are encouraged to apply. Students from underrepresented or marginalized groups are particularly encouraged to apply.

Faculty member or graduate student

Dr. Margo Monteith, Distinguished Professor—Social Psychology

Anna Li, graduate student, —Social Psychology

Liz Noland, graduate student, —Social Psychology

Description of research area 

Research in Dr. Monteith’s Intergroup Relations and Inclusion lab explores issues related to stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination.

Topics of investigation include:

  • Implicit or unconscious biases and their effect on people’s perceptions, evaluations, and behaviors in relation to outgroups (e.g., White people in relation to Black people)
  • The self-regulation of biased behavior
  • Confrontations of bias (e.g., how people react when they are confronted; how to make confrontations more effective)
Description of undergraduate participation

The lab experience is designed to provide students with hands-on experience with the research process.

Research assistants engage in weekly one-hour research group meetings will be held to discuss various projects in the lab and to help undergraduate assistants to learn what our research is all about. Additional time will be spent on planning and execution (e.g., data collection) of the research projects. Scheduling is flexible.

Research setting

Labs in Psychology Building

Number of assistants needed

5

Contact information

Please reach out to Anna Li (a graduate student in the Monteith lab), li4268@purdue.edu  for an application

Additional comments
  • Must have completed PSY 120
  • Completion of or enrollment in PSY 240 and PSY 203 preferred
  • GPA of 3.0 or higher is preferred
  • Minimum commitment of 3 credits per term (9 hours per week) required, as well as two terms overall

However, all interested candidates are encouraged to apply. We especially encourage people from underrepresented or marginalized groups to apply.

Faculty member or graduate student

Dr. Thekla Morgenroth (they/them/their), Assistant Professor—Social Psychology

Kira Means (she/her), graduate student – Social Psychology

Heejoo Chung (she/her), graduate student – Social Psychology

Yanzhe (Austin) Zeng (he/him), lab manager – Social Psychology

Description of research area 

Research in the UNICORN (UNderstanding Identity and the COntinuance of Roles and Norms) lab examines how and why people defend and maintain social categories and hierarchies.

Topics of investigation include:

  • LGBTQ+ issues
  • Gender and the gender binary
  • The psychology of different feminist ideologies
  • Opposition to trans-inclusive policies
  • Stereotypes and prejudice
Description of undergraduate participation

The lab experience is designed to provide students with hands-on experience with the research process.

Research assistants have the opportunity to:

  • Conduct research using a variety of research designs and methods
  • Gain experience in software used for research (e.g., Qualtrics, SPSS)
  • Engage with and code open-response data
  • Read and analyze published academic articles
  • Be active participants in weekly lab meetings and discussions about research

More experienced research assistants also have opportunities to:

  • Engage in independent research projects, mentored by Dr. Morgenroth
  • Present their results to the lab
  • Train and mentor incoming undergraduate research assistants
Research setting

Work will be carried out in a joint lab space in person at specific times (depending on your schedule).

Number of assistants needed

2-5

To apply

Please fill out the following survey by April 5th. You will hear back within 1-2 weeks of this deadline.

https://purdue.ca1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_a8CUIaw5Qvcm7lQ

Additional comments

Members of underrepresented or marginalized groups are particularly encouraged to apply. In addition, individuals interested in pursuing careers in academic research and/or who may be interested in working in the lab for more than one semester are particularly encouraged to apply. Students should be able to commit at least 6 hours/week (2 credits).

Faculty member

Dr. Anne B. Sereno, Professor –Mathematical and Computational Psychology, Cognitive Psychology, Neuroscience & Behavior, and Biomedical Engineering

Daniel Larranaga McGough, graduate student – Neuroscience & Behavior

Description of Research Area 

Research in Dr. Sereno’s research spans a wide array of topics in computational modeling, cognitive neuroscience, , and biomedical engineering.

Topics of investigation include:

  • The factors that impact the time course of spatial attention
  • The cortical representations of lexical semantics, attention, and memory
  • Investigations of the effects of age on spatial processing
  • Computational modeling, population decoding methods, and instrumentation
  • Classification of motor movements for disease (e.g., bradykinesia, tremor, cognitive deficits)
  • The effects of traumatic brain injury
Description of undergraduate participation

The lab experience is designed to provide students with hands-on experience with the research process.

Research assistants engage in weekly one-hour lab meetings where we will discuss various projects in the lab. Additional time will be spent on planning and execution (e.g., data collection) of the research projects. Scheduling is flexible. If student’s perform exceptionally well, there may be opportunities for the research honors program.

Research Setting

Labs in Psychology Building and Pierce Hall

Number of Assistants Needed:

2-5

Contact Information

Please reach out to Daniel Larranaga McGough (a graduate student in the Sereno lab) at dlarran@purdue.edu for an application.

Additional comments
  • Must have completed PSY 120
  • Completion of PSY 200, 201, and 203 preferred
  • GPA of 3.0 or higher is preferred
  • Minimum commitment of 3 credits per term (9 hours per week) required, as well as two terms overall

However, all interested candidates are encouraged to apply. We especially encourage people from underrepresented or marginalized groups to apply.

Faculty member

Dr. Darryl W. Schneider

Description of Research Area 

We conduct basic research on attention and cognitive control. Recent studies in our lab have examined alertness and attentional focusing in selective attention tasks, as well as how people switch between tasks and resume interrupted tasks.

Description of undergraduate participation

Students will be primarily responsible for help with data collection in behavioral experiments. For Fall 2024, students will work mainly on experiments for a project about factors that affect the ability to focus visual attention. Students will also participate in regular lab meetings and discussions of research with Dr. Schneider and other lab members.

Research Setting

Experiments are conducted in laboratory rooms on the 3rd floor of the PSYC building.

Number of Assistants Needed:

We are seeking 2-3 students.

Contact Information

Dr. Darryl W. Schneider

Office: PSYC 3174

Email: dws@purdue.edu

Website: https://web.ics.purdue.edu/~dws/

Additional comments

A commitment of 3 credits per semester (9 hours per week) is required.

Faculty Member and Graduate Students

Susan South, PhD Professor – Clinical Psychology

Jessica Dupree, Graduate Researcher

Magaret Lupo, Graduate Researcher

Description of Research

Research in the Relationships and Mental Health Lab seeks to investigate the role psychopathology plays within intimate romantic relationship experiences. Past research in the RMH Lab has focused on links between trait personality and dysfunction within marital relationships, as well as the interplay between personality and psychopathology and their influence on one another.

Currently, the lab is funded for a project examining the effects of adverse interpersonal experiences on mild cognitive impairment in older adult twins. Additionally, the lab is in collaboration with Dr. Chris Eckhardt’s team to investigate the impact of stress, mood, and alcohol use on relationship experiences, and Dr. David Rollock’s lab to investigate discrimination, relationship functioning, and mental health.

Description of Undergraduate Participation

Research assistants will help facilitate data collection by assisting with participant concerns, programming surveys, as well as entering or analyzing data.

Research assistants will also attend biweekly lab meetings to read and discuss relevant journal articles, watch presentations from Dr. South and graduate students regarding research processes to gain additional experience useful for graduate school. Research assistants that have been with the lab for more than one semester may also have an opportunity to conduct their own independent research project.

Research Setting

Most of our research will take place in our lab space in the Psychological Sciences building. Some work may be completed remotely.

Number of Research Assistants Needed

3

Contact Information

For questions, please contact Dr. South: ssouth@purdue.edu

To apply, please contact RMHLab@purdue.edu for an application

Additional Comments

Students taking the course for credit should commit to working 3 hours in the lab for each credit (e.g. 9 hours/week for 3 credits).

Faculty Member

Louis Tay, PhD, Professor, Industrial-Organizational Psychology, WAM Lab Director

Description of Research 

The Well-Being and Measurement (WAM) Lab pursues cross-disciplinary research on human well-being and methodology.

Description of Undergraduate Participation

Research assistants perform a variety of tasks, including:

  • Learning and practicing literature review techniques
  • Collecting, cleaning, and analyzing data
  • Assessing traits and characteristics of people from videos or their writing
  • Developing research study materials

Topic areas for fall 2024:

  • Authenticity and Personality
  • Work-Life Balance and Well-being
  • Work Relationships
  • Trait Assessment
  • Big Data/AI/ML

You can find a draft of the syllabus here.

Research Setting

All work is completed in the Psychological Sciences building or in virtual space. Research assistants spend most of their hours working in the lab.

Number of Assistants Needed

We are recruiting up to 4 new undergraduate students to join the WAM Lab in Fall 2024 to work alongside graduate students and senior researchers. Research assistants are expected to work an average of 9 hours per week during the semester and receive 3 credits for PSY 39000.

How to Apply

To apply, please send an email to stay@purdue.edu and lioug@purdue.edu (include both email addresses as recipients) with the following materials:

  • A very brief statement (no longer than one page) describing 1) who you are, 2) why you are interested in joining our lab, 3) your prior research experience and technical skills (e.g., computer programming), and 4) your weekly availability
  • A CV or resume, if available
  • An unofficial transcript

Although we prefer students with relevant skills and GPAs over 3.3, all interested students are encouraged to apply. Applications will be processed in the order they are received. Please reach out if you have any questions!

Registering and Earning Credit for PSY 39000

Registration for PSY 39000 is done during open registration using Scheduling Assistant — not during pre-registration using the course request form. Although PSY 39000 may be taken more than once, no more than six credits may be taken for a standard grade. All additional PSY 39000 credits must be taken as pass/no pass credit. Only three credits of standard-grade PSY 39000 can be used in the psychological sciences major, the brain and behavior science major, or the psychological sciences minor.

During the 16-week fall or spring semester, you are expected to work three hours in the lab for every credit earned (e.g., three credits would require nine lab hours per week). After the fourth week of the fall or spring semester, you may not register for three credit hours of PSY 39000 without special permission from the Department of Psychological Sciences. Late enrollment in PSY 390 during any semester reduces the number of possible credit hours you can earn.

During the eight-week summer session, you are expected to work in the lab six hours per week for every credit earned (e.g., three credits would require 18 lab hours per week).

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